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Rohn Federbush

Ann Arbor, Michigan Author

 

July 23, 2016

Small Press Department

Barnes & Noble

122 Fifth Avenue

New York, NY 10011

In Lincoln’s Shadow

ISBN 978-1-5049-3357-5

 

Dear Evelyn VeLazuez, Coordinator,

                Following your suggestions please consider this my fifteenth request for Barnes & Noble to shelve my book “In Lincoln’s Shadow” in your Ann Arbor, Michigan store. A year ago I paid substantially for three years of returnable books from the publisher, Author House. In 2013 “In Lincoln’s Shadow” finaled in the Inspirational Romantic Mystery/Suspense category held by the Daphne Du Mauier Award sponsored by the RWA Kiss of Death Chapter. Lincoln’ quotations used by the detective when his emotions need calming are from “The Life of Lincoln,” 1858-1865, published by P.F. Collier, New York, NY 1906—as noted in thirty references. The setting’s cover photo of the Ann Arbor City Club is another shelf-appeal factor.

                Your delay in offering my book has undermined my marketing efforts here in Ann Arbor and around the state. One local reader had to argue with a sales clerk who ordered and delivered the book (after some delay)—about not being able to return it. I apologize for the obvious lack of a patient tone in this appeal. My frustration is continuing to grow.

                On August 23, 2015 The New York Times Book Review featured my book “Separation Anxiety” on page two (ISBN 978-5049-2012-4). My July 2016 release “St. Joan’s Architect” by Reader’s Digest LifeRich (ISBN 978-1-4897-0775-8) has already received three five star reviews on Amazon and several more on LinkedIn. Because of previous delays, I’m hoping you will consider shelf space for these two books, too.

Sincerely,

 

Rohn Federbush

734-994-6217, 734-223-6045

2141 Pauline Court

Ann Arbor MI 48103

www.rohnfederbush.com

rohn@comcast.net

 

 

 

St. Joan’s Architect – Reader’s Raving Reviews

St Joan's Architect - Cover

By Jen L. on July 6, 2016

Art, history, island life, and romance. Lovely romantic read on the island of Mont Saint Michel. The protagonist, Catherine, is approached by St Joan of Arc and given a mission. She starts to fall for Romee, an artist, as her conservative mother watches out and advises her. The connection between mother and daughter is showcased as we witness the continuous dialogue between Catherine and her mother. I absolutely loved Rohn’s classic smooth writing style. It was a very pleasant, fun, that had me inspired by the end.

5.0 out of 5 stars Pleasure to read

By Michelle Geist on June 28, 2016

Set upon the magical island of Mont Saint Michel, this is a romantic and beautiful tale. Federbush has created a world where history and the modern day meet, and explores an original idea in which this meeting creates an opportunity for Joan of Arc to live on into the present. Through Catherine Marksteiner, a young student, Joan is able to convey messages. The theme of St Joan’s Architect is one of art, the love of art, and the importance of remembering the people who helped shape our heritage and make it possible to achieve what we want in life. An inspiring story and a pleasure to read.

5.0 out of 5 stars Romantic and historical with a twist

By Julie Burroughs on June 22, 2016

‘St Joan’s Architect’ combines fiction, with historical facts about the island of Mont Saint Michel and it’s previous inhabitants. The story follows a young architectural student, Catherine, who is persuaded by St Joan of Arc herself to undertake a project in her memory. A love story between Catherine and resident Romee adds to the passion of the situation. I enjoyed the development of the relationships in this story, and the little elements of humor made for a light hearted read. A well written romantic story with a historical twist that kept me highly entertained.

 

St. Joan Five Star Reviews

St Joan's Architect - Cover

By Jen L. on July 6, 2016

Art, history, island life, and romance. Lovely romantic read on the island of Mont Saint Michel. The protagonist, Catherine, is approached by St Joan of Arc and given a mission. She starts to fall for Romee, an artist, as her conservative mother watches out and advises her. The connection between mother and daughter is showcased as we witness the continuous dialogue between Catherine and her mother. I absolutely loved Rohn’s classic smooth writing style. It was a very pleasant, fun, that had me inspired by the end.

5.0 out of 5 stars Pleasure to read

By Michelle Geist on June 28, 2016

Set upon the magical island of Mont Saint Michel, this is a romantic and beautiful tale. Federbush has created a world where history and the modern day meet, and explores an original idea in which this meeting creates an opportunity for Joan of Arc to live on into the present. Through Catherine Marksteiner, a young student, Joan is able to convey messages. The theme of St Joan’s Architect is one of art, the love of art, and the importance of remembering the people who helped shape our heritage and make it possible to achieve what we want in life. An inspiring story and a pleasure to read.

5.0 out of 5 stars Romantic and historical with a twist

By Julie Burroughs on June 22, 2016

‘St Joan’s Architect’ combines fiction, with historical facts about the island of Mont Saint Michel and it’s previous inhabitants. The story follows a young architectural student, Catherine, who is persuaded by St Joan of Arc herself to undertake a project in her memory. A love story between Catherine and resident Romee adds to the passion of the situation. I enjoyed the development of the relationships in this story, and the little elements of humor made for a light hearted read. A well written romantic story with a historical twist that kept me highly entertained.

 

IWSG: Calling All Authors

Interview Questions

1. Over the length of your career how many manuscripts have you published?

2. Do you use a critique group or Beta readers for feedback?

3. How many agents have you become acquainted with and what were their redeeming characteristics?

4. How do you track your readers to inform them of new books being published?

5. How long were you subsisting on royalties without other employment?

6. What advice do you have for tax records?

7. How has RWA National been of assistance to your career?

8. Of all your characters which is your favorite?

9. Which book are you most proud of?

10. Which publisher was the most helpful with marketing and distribution?

11. Which book is in line to be published next?

12. Do you offer reviews for your fellow writers?

Purpose: To share and encourage. Writers can express doubts and concerns without fear of appearing foolish or weak. Those who have been through the fire can offer assistance and guidance. It’s a safe haven for insecure writers of all kinds!

Posting: The first Wednesday of every month is officially Insecure Writer’s Support Group day. Post your thoughts on your own blog. Talk about your doubts and the fears you have conquered. Discuss your struggles and triumphs. Offer a word of encouragement for others who are struggling. Visit others in the group and connect with your fellow writer – aim for a dozen new people each time. 

Let’s rock the neurotic writing world!

Twitter hashtag is #IWSG

Public Consumption

In this day and age of mass distribution of intimate details, what do you consider your most unique characteristic?

Just for today are you able to eke out a quiet half hour all by yourself to relax to get a better perspective of your life?

Is today sufficient to tackle one problem without sustaining the solution for a lifetime?

Do you believe as Lincoln says that most folks are as happy as they make up their minds to be?”

Is there something you should study to strengthen your mind, something useful?

Are you able to exercise your soul in three ways: does somebody a good turn and not get found out; if anyone knows about it, it will not count? Do at least two things you don’t want to do—just for exercise. Don’t show anyone your feelings are hurt even though they are hurt?

Is being agreeable to much to ask for today: Dress becomingly, keeping your voice low, being courteous, criticizing not one bit, not finding fault with anything, nor trying to improve or regulate anybody but yourself?

Wonder if I can accomplish even one suggestion today?

Professional Opinions

Here a list of questions I’m only learning to ask about the publishing business. If you have the time or experience, I would appreciate your help.

  1. When I come across a book I really like, I send a review to the author for approval to post on Amazon, is that normal practice?
  2. Have you ever been approached to use quotes from your reviews as part of a jacket recommendation?
  3. What do you find is the best approach for garnering reviews?
  4. Is this acceptable, “Please let me know if you enjoy my book?”
  5. As for all unknown subjects, I’m not sure I’m covering the information I need. What other questions should I be asking?
  6. How do you enjoy readers to post reviews on both Amazon and Barnes & Noble?

Thank you for your time.

Meet Rohn Federbush

Visit Ann Arbor Author Rohn Federbush

on June 18th from Noon to 5pm at the

Ann Arbor Book Festival

on Washington Street between 4th and 5th Streets.

Ann Arbor Book Festival

Her latest release St. Joan’s Architect will be on sale

St Joan's Architect - Cover (3)

In the meantime take advantage of her FREE BOOK

Hastings’ Dead

Hastings' Dead - Prototype Cover (3)

Unbiased Reviews Welcome

Shakespeare’s Lexicon of St. Joan

052516 Blog

Did Shakespeare vent his spleen in Henry VI? Was the dialogue of his characters a convenient excuse for describing France’s savior with vitriolic adjectives? St. Joan didn’t deserve to be called: a mad chambermaid, a beggar’s brat, algayne of the devil, drab of Lorraine, Armagnac’s whore, or the devil’s milkmaid. The virgin leader of France’s dispirited troops beat the round heads fair and square. Of course, saying she could pull them down from the clouds themselves didn’t endear her to England. St. Joan called them god-damns because of their constant swear words. She promised her own army they would be victorious if they stopped taking the Lord’s name in vain. And does France appreciate their heroine, or is she relegated to encouraging young women that their dreams can be made real. I think she will haunt France until she is given her due recognition, despite the grand Shakespeare’s ill muse.